Twohandedshift

Reflections, reviews and musings about menswear.

““People want things with integrity,” he explains, and in response to that, he is opening a custom-tailor shop adjacent to his offices. Calling it “an experiment in taste,” the designer hopes to find those willing to embrace the haberdashery spirit.”

—   The beginnings; 29 years ago. Excerpt from an interview with Alan in W Magazine, 1985: The Charm of a Well-Dressed Man (via alanflusser)

David Berglas

“The rise of haute couture in the early 20th century dovetailed with advances in communication and travel, and so, too, the public’s unusual interest in this rarefied world. There are well-known stories of Paris policemen and taxi drivers being able to recognize couture, like a cop in the ’30s who refused to arrest a feminist agitator on the grounds that she was dressed by Molyneux. By the ’60s, everyone knew about the latest fashion, if not from Mary Quant, then from the Beatles. But sometime in the late ’80s, fashion discovered semiotics. Clothes suddenly acquired meaning (think of the efforts to “decode” a Helmut Lang show or almost any by Martin Margiela). You truly needed to be an expert to appreciate why a jacket was worn inside out or why a dress that made you look like a bag lady was cool. Susan Sontag described a similar shift in the arts in the mid-60s, noting that “the most interesting and creative art of our time is not open to the generally educated; it demands special effort; it speaks a specialized language.” Today, as high fashion moves closer to mass media — with brand-hosted YouTube channels, films, huge spectacles — there is pressure to simplify. I also wonder whether the surge of new brands — their shows often crammed with weird and banal designs — hasn’t caused elite designers to rethink matters. Hence more straightforward clothes.”

thestudenttailor:

A four by four navy double breasted blazer with patch pockets and peaked lapels is just about my favourite menswear staple…
agnelli-esque:

source:www.roseborn.com


A naturally narrow shouldered man. The peak lapels and the roped shoulder add breadth to the silhouette without resorting to hard unnatural shoulders. The patch pockets are a lovely casual touch however they compromise I think this wearer’s figure by adding visual weight to the thus making him appear more compact. Whether such compromises are justified is a matter of personal taste.

thestudenttailor:

A four by four navy double breasted blazer with patch pockets and peaked lapels is just about my favourite menswear staple…

agnelli-esque:

source:www.roseborn.com

A naturally narrow shouldered man. The peak lapels and the roped shoulder add breadth to the silhouette without resorting to hard unnatural shoulders. The patch pockets are a lovely casual touch however they compromise I think this wearer’s figure by adding visual weight to the thus making him appear more compact. Whether such compromises are justified is a matter of personal taste.

Sydney Winter Wear

Dress and Manners

Dressing well is a form of good manners but is a not replacement for good manners.

sartorial-journal:

Liverano style:
1. Soft sloped shoulder that is slightly extended
2. Generous collar and lapel, classically proportioned with a low notch
3. Clean sleeve head
4. Breast pocket sits lower on the chest to compliment the collar and lapel
5. A light hand stitched canvas is used at the chest, an even softer gauge is used for the rest of the jacket
6. 3 button rolled to 2 configuration
7. Rich chest for a masculine shape
8. The jacket meets only at the central button due to the distinctive cut away style
9. Open quarters or cut away jacket opening. Typical Florentina style
10. Jackets can be side vented or un-vented
11. Pockets can be patch, jetted or flapped
12. Curved sleeve

sartorial-journal:

Liverano style:

1. Soft sloped shoulder that is slightly extended

2. Generous collar and lapel, classically proportioned with a low notch

3. Clean sleeve head

4. Breast pocket sits lower on the chest to compliment the collar and lapel

5. A light hand stitched canvas is used at the chest, an even softer gauge is used for the rest of the jacket

6. 3 button rolled to 2 configuration

7. Rich chest for a masculine shape

8. The jacket meets only at the central button due to the distinctive cut away style

9. Open quarters or cut away jacket opening. Typical Florentina style

10. Jackets can be side vented or un-vented

11. Pockets can be patch, jetted or flapped

12. Curved sleeve

(via aandhmag)

drivingincarswithpocketsquares:

Saturday Night Beer Tasting
Needles
Gitman Bros. Vintage
Epaulet
Russell Moccasin
Baby

The next big thing to hit Piiti 89.

drivingincarswithpocketsquares:

Saturday Night Beer Tasting


Needles

Gitman Bros. Vintage

Epaulet

Russell Moccasin

Baby

The next big thing to hit Piiti 89.

Clues.
WIWY